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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Synthetic Biology Comes into Its Own

Synthetic Biology Comes into Its Own

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers create novel genetic circuits that give insight into, and are inspired by, nature.

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image: New Zika Diagnostic

New Zika Diagnostic

By | May 9, 2016

A paper-based RNA test may offer a low-cost method for detecting the virus in the field.

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image: Lu on Syn Bio

Lu on Syn Bio

By | May 1, 2016

MIT researcher and Scientist to Watch Timothy Lu talks about the value of cross-disciplinary approaches in bringing synthetic biology into the clinic.

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image: Timothy Lu: Niche Perfect

Timothy Lu: Niche Perfect

By | May 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Departments of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science and Biological Engineering, MIT. Age: 35

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image: Biological Programming

Biological Programming

By | April 1, 2016

A new tool makes programming living cells like writing computer software.

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image: Next Generation: Toward Synthetic Neural Tissue

Next Generation: Toward Synthetic Neural Tissue

By | April 1, 2016

Scientists produce a tissue-like material containing hundreds of light-activated compartments that transmits an electrical signal when illuminated.

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image: Minimal Genome Created

Minimal Genome Created

By | March 24, 2016

Scientists build a living cellular organism with a genome smaller than any known in nature.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

1 Comment

image: Reducing Repetition While Building Biopolymers

Reducing Repetition While Building Biopolymers

By | January 11, 2016

A free algorithm helps synthetic biologists decide which codons to use to encode repetitive proteins using the least-repetitive DNA sequence possible.

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