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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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The genomes of two species of water bears reveal clues about how they persist in extreme conditions, yet don’t resolve the animals’ debated evolutionary story.

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image: UK Researchers Used Fewer Animals Last Year

UK Researchers Used Fewer Animals Last Year

By | July 13, 2017

Experiments involving animals dropped by more than 200,000, or 5 percent, in 2016.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Insect Cuticle Aids Spiders’ Traps

Insect Cuticle Aids Spiders’ Traps

By | June 2, 2017

Prey stick to orb-weaver spider webs because their waxy outer layers mesh with spider silk to form a matrix glue.

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image: Opinion: Address Taxonomic Skew

Opinion: Address Taxonomic Skew

By and | May 30, 2017

The domination of model organisms and charismatic megafauna in the literature is a disservice to the life sciences.

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Animal experiments published in a handful of cardiovascular journals mostly ignore NIH guidelines.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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