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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: Circadian Responses to Chemo

Circadian Responses to Chemo

By | April 21, 2015

After exposure to curcumin, rat cancer cell populations undergo a daily cycle of cell death.

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: USDA Research Facility on Lockdown

USDA Research Facility on Lockdown

By | March 10, 2015

The US Department of Agriculture is halting new research at its Meat Animal Research Center until animal welfare-related conditions improve.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Galileo’s Middle Finger</em>

Book Excerpt from Galileo’s Middle Finger

By | March 10, 2015

In Chapter 4, “A Show-Me State of Mind,” author Alice Dreger describes the start of her journey studying scientists who had conducted controversial research.

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image: Stirring the Pot

Stirring the Pot

By | March 1, 2015

How to navigate the slings and arrows of conducting “controversial” research

4 Comments

image: Ebola Victims Still Infectious a Week After Death

Ebola Victims Still Infectious a Week After Death

By | February 12, 2015

Ebola virus can remain infectious for up to seven days on the bodies of monkeys that died from the disease, researchers show.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

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