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image: A Tale of Two Genitals

A Tale of Two Genitals

By | November 5, 2014

The genitalia of mammals and reptiles develop from two different tissues, but the structures share common genetic programs and molecular induction signals.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Walking Whales</em>

Book Excerpt from The Walking Whales

By | November 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “Fossils and War,” author J.G.M. “Hans” Thewissen describes the difficulties of conducting field research in a conflict zone.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2014

Leonardo's Brain, The Future of the Brain, Dodging Extinction, and Arrival of the Fittest

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Ever-Transcendent Cell

The Ever-Transcendent Cell

By | November 1, 2014

Deriving physiologic first principles

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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image: Rapid Evolution in Real Time

Rapid Evolution in Real Time

By | October 23, 2014

On islands off the coast of Florida, scientists uncover swift adaptive changes among Carolina anole populations, whose habitats were disturbed by the introduction of another lizard species.

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image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.

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image: Ancient Sex

Ancient Sex

By | October 19, 2014

Fossils of an extinct, armored fish challenge current understanding of when copulation and internal fertilization evolved in jawed vertebrates.

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image: New Genes = New Archaea?

New Genes = New Archaea?

By | October 15, 2014

Genes acquired from bacteria contributed to the origins of archaeal lineages, a large-scale phylogenetic analysis suggests.

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