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image: More Carbon Dioxide, Fewer Crop Nutrients

More Carbon Dioxide, Fewer Crop Nutrients

By | May 8, 2014

Plants grown in higher concentrations of CO2 have greater yields, but lower amounts of essential nutrients.

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image: Week in Review: April 28–May 2

Week in Review: April 28–May 2

By | May 2, 2014

Male scientists stress mice out; using SCNT to reprogram adult cells; acetate can reach mouse brain, reduce appetite; WHO sounds “post-antibiotic era” alarm

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image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.

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image: Another Way Fiber Is Filling

Another Way Fiber Is Filling

By | April 29, 2014

Acetate, a short-chain fatty acid released following the fermentation of dietary fiber in the gut, accumulates in the brain and can affect appetite in mice.

4 Comments

image: Epigenetic Effects of Mom’s Diet

Epigenetic Effects of Mom’s Diet

By | April 29, 2014

Molecular markers of a mother’s nutrition around the time of conception can be found in her child’s DNA.

4 Comments

image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

3 Comments

image: Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

By | March 19, 2014

Exposure to vitamin A in the womb influences immune system development and lifelong ability to fight infections, a mouse study shows. 

1 Comment

image: Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

By | March 19, 2014

Commensal bacteria that populate the human gastrointestinal tract help digest dark chocolate, releasing anti-inflammatory compounds, researchers report.

1 Comment

image: Origins of Lactase Persistence in Africa

Origins of Lactase Persistence in Africa

By | March 13, 2014

Large-scale sequencing effort confirms several mutations that confer lactase persistence in Africans, while haplotype analysis sheds light on the trait’s origins.

3 Comments

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