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image: Three Monkey Brains, One Robotic Arm

Three Monkey Brains, One Robotic Arm

By | July 10, 2015

Researchers network the brains of three monkeys to create a “living computer” that can steer an image of a robotic arm toward a target.

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image: Gene Therapy Fixes Mouse Hearing

Gene Therapy Fixes Mouse Hearing

By | July 9, 2015

Expressing a gene for a component of the inner ear’s hair cells treated a form of genetic deafness.

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image: Can We Smell A Trillion Odors?

Can We Smell A Trillion Odors?

By | July 8, 2015

A reanalysis calls into question a year-old claim that humans can decipher at least 1 trillion different scents.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2015

Stoned, Anxious, The Deeper Genome, and Testosterone

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image: Keeping Science Pubs Clean

Keeping Science Pubs Clean

By | June 29, 2015

Science releases new guidelines for research transparency, hoping to stem the tide of retractions and misconduct.

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image: New Human Brain Language Map

New Human Brain Language Map

By | June 26, 2015

Researchers find that Wernicke’s area, thought to be the seat of language comprehension in the human brain for more than a century, is not.

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image: Week in Review: June 22–26

Week in Review: June 22–26

By | June 26, 2015

Neanderthal-human hybrid discovered; the neurobiology of fear behavior; and an insulin patch that responds to high glucose levels in mice

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image: The Brain on Fear

The Brain on Fear

By | June 25, 2015

Scientists uncover the neurons in the mouse brain responsible for linking the sight of a looming object to scared behavior.

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image: Device Trials Go Unpublished

Device Trials Go Unpublished

By | June 24, 2015

Just half of the clinical studies used to gain premarket approval for cardiac devices ever make it into the scientific literature.

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image: Widespread Data Duplication

Widespread Data Duplication

By | June 17, 2015

Around one out of every four cancer papers scrutinized in a recent study contains questionable figures, and journals and authors aren’t responding to requests for clarification.

5 Comments

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