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» publishing and immunology

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image: Child-Proofing Drugs

Child-Proofing Drugs

By | March 1, 2012

When children need medications, getting the dosing and method of administration right is like trying to hit a moving target with an untried weapon.

6 Comments

image: Skin-Deep Immunity

Skin-Deep Immunity

By | February 29, 2012

Immune cells in skin provide powerful protection against infection, suggesting new routes for vaccination.

6 Comments

image: Bird Flu Paper Publication Delayed

Bird Flu Paper Publication Delayed

By | February 17, 2012

The World Health Organization announced today that it recommends publishing the two controversial H5N1 papers in full, as soon as a few details are worked out. And Science is listening.

6 Comments

image: Publishers Strong Arm for Impact Factors?

Publishers Strong Arm for Impact Factors?

By | February 6, 2012

A survey shows that younger researchers in the social sciences and business fields are being told to cite more papers from the journal that is publishing their work.

6 Comments

image: Switching the Bait

Switching the Bait

By | February 1, 2012

Turning a standard technique into an unbiased screen for diagnostic biomarkers

6 Comments

image: Immune Heat

Immune Heat

By | February 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

3 Comments

image: A Peer Review Revolution?

A Peer Review Revolution?

By | January 24, 2012

A new social network provides a novel forum for science publishing and peer review.

9 Comments

image: Is India Polio Free?

Is India Polio Free?

By | January 12, 2012

This week will mark the one-year anniversary of the last polio case in the second-most populous country.

6 Comments

image: Clinical Trial Data Repressed

Clinical Trial Data Repressed

By | January 5, 2012

A new study finds that important drug safety data are not seeing the light of day.

0 Comments

image: Chimp Viruses for Human Vaccines

Chimp Viruses for Human Vaccines

By | January 4, 2012

An adenovirus isolated from chimpanzee feces proves more effective than human adenoviruses as a vaccine vector for hepatitis C.

4 Comments

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