The Scientist

» publishing and culture

Most Recent

image: New Journal Scrutinizes the Research Process

New Journal Scrutinizes the Research Process

By | May 3, 2016

Studies in Research Integrity and Peer Review analyze ethics and quality in both science and publishing.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

By | May 2, 2016

Breaking down lengthy, narrative-driven biomedical articles into brief reports on singular observations or experiments could increase reproducibility and accessibility in the literature.

3 Comments

In the book's prologue, author Frans de Waal considers the intellectual impediments to studying animal intelligence.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2016

May 2016's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: The Global Science Era

The Global Science Era

By | May 1, 2016

As international collaboration becomes increasingly common, researchers must work to limit their own biases and let cultural diversity enhance their work.

2 Comments

image: The Zombie Literature

The Zombie Literature

By | May 1, 2016

Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

9 Comments

image: To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

By | May 1, 2016

The study of nonhuman intelligence is coming into its own as researchers realize the unique contexts in which distinct species learn and behave.

3 Comments

image: Repeat Offenders

Repeat Offenders

By | April 25, 2016

Scanning the literature, scientists find that nearly 2 percent of papers contain duplicated and manipulated figures, among other image-prep no-nos.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Decoding the Tripping Brain
  2. Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes
    The Nutshell Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes

    Analysis of the bodies of deceased individuals can’t determine what effect these tattoo remnants have on lymph function, but researchers suggest dirty needles aren’t the only risk of the age-old practice.

  3. Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?
  4. Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny
    Daily News Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny

    Out of 25,000 features originally detected by metabolic profiling of E. coli, fewer than 1,000 represent unique metabolites, a study finds.

AAAS