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image: Opinion: Honorary Authorship Is Antiquated Etiquette

Opinion: Honorary Authorship Is Antiquated Etiquette

By | October 16, 2013

Though the practice may be well-intentioned, naming courtesy authors can hurt science and scientists.

3 Comments

image: Useless Peer Review?

Useless Peer Review?

By | October 15, 2013

A study shows that the methods by which scientists evaluate each other’s work are error-prone and poor at measuring merit.

3 Comments

image: Fighting Viruses with RNAi

Fighting Viruses with RNAi

By | October 10, 2013

The long-debated issue of whether mammals can use RNA interference as an antiviral defense mechanism is finally put to rest.

0 Comments

image: Mislabeled Microbes Cause Two Retractions

Mislabeled Microbes Cause Two Retractions

By | October 10, 2013

Two papers on plant immunity have been retracted, and questions remain about others with similar results. 

9 Comments

image: Fake Paper Exposes Failed Peer Review

Fake Paper Exposes Failed Peer Review

By | October 6, 2013

The widespread acceptance of an atrocious manuscript, fabricated by an investigative journalist, reveals the near absence of quality at some journals.

2 Comments

image: New Organelle: The Tannosome

New Organelle: The Tannosome

By | September 23, 2013

Researchers identify a structure in plants responsible for the production of tannins.

1 Comment

image: Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

By | September 18, 2013

By removing a single gene, adult cells can be reprogrammed into a stem-like state with nearly 100 percent efficiency.

3 Comments

image: What to Do About “Clare Francis”

What to Do About “Clare Francis”

By | September 14, 2013

Anonymous tipsters who allege scientific misconduct can make journal editors squeamish. But should a whistleblower's identity matter?

7 Comments

image: U.S. Drops in Share of Publications

U.S. Drops in Share of Publications

By | September 12, 2013

New analysis reveals increased globalization of science, leading to a greater proportion of patents and papers coming out of developing countries.

0 Comments

image: Green OA Is Golden

Green OA Is Golden

By | September 10, 2013

A new report lauds the UK government’s commitment to open access, but calls its early devotion to the gold model a “mistake.”

2 Comments

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