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image: Journal Price Tags Revealed

Journal Price Tags Revealed

By | June 18, 2014

Economists explore the wheelings and dealings of universities and publishers during largely secret negotiations regarding access to scientific journals.

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Can Publication Records Predict Future PIs?

Can Publication Records Predict Future PIs?

By | June 2, 2014

Researchers present a tool that uses a scientist’s PubMed data to estimate the probability of becoming a principal investigator in academia.

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image: Simultaneous Release

Simultaneous Release

By | June 1, 2014

Coordinating the submission of manuscripts can strike a healthy balance between competition and collaboration.

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image: Replication Gone Wrong

Replication Gone Wrong

By | May 29, 2014

Efforts to reproduce an experimental psychology study yield failure, accusations, and ultimately, discourse on how to improve the process.

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image: Publishing Data

Publishing Data

By | May 29, 2014

Nature’s publisher launches a new peer-reviewed, online-only journal that will accept descriptions of data sets.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: Sloppy Notes Led to Goodall Plagiarism

Sloppy Notes Led to Goodall Plagiarism

By | April 1, 2014

Jane Goodall’s latest book was revised to eliminate plagiarism, which she blames on chaotic note-taking.  

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