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Cellular Research
Cellular Research

The Scientist

» publishing and developmental biology

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: Keeping Science Pubs Clean

Keeping Science Pubs Clean

By | June 29, 2015

Science releases new guidelines for research transparency, hoping to stem the tide of retractions and misconduct.

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image: Device Trials Go Unpublished

Device Trials Go Unpublished

By | June 24, 2015

Just half of the clinical studies used to gain premarket approval for cardiac devices ever make it into the scientific literature.

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image: Widespread Data Duplication

Widespread Data Duplication

By | June 17, 2015

Around one out of every four cancer papers scrutinized in a recent study contains questionable figures, and journals and authors aren’t responding to requests for clarification.

5 Comments

image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

1 Comment

image: Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

By | June 1, 2015

The number of plagiarism-based retractions has grown since the advent of detection software, according to a BioMed Central analysis.

4 Comments

image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

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