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image: Website Flags Wrongly Paywalled Papers

Website Flags Wrongly Paywalled Papers

By | May 31, 2017

Thousands of open access papers have mistakenly asked readers to pay access fees, but publishers are correcting the errors. 

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image: Opinion: The Frustrating Process of Manuscript Submission

Opinion: The Frustrating Process of Manuscript Submission

By and | May 10, 2017

We suggest a centralized facility for submitting to journals—one that would benefit scientists and not only publishers.

3 Comments

The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

3 Comments

Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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image: Infographic: Web of Retractions

Infographic: Web of Retractions

By | May 1, 2017

See coauthors' connections to eight researchers with problematic papers.

1 Comment

The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

By | April 6, 2017

Our totally bogus case report swiftly passed muster, with only minor revisions requested.

10 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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