Advertisement
RayBiotech
RayBiotech

The Scientist

» publishing and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: NIH Tackles Irreproducibility

NIH Tackles Irreproducibility

By | January 28, 2014

The federal agency speaks out about how to improve the quality of scientific research.

5 Comments

image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

0 Comments

image: New Neuroscience Journal to Launch

New Neuroscience Journal to Launch

By | January 15, 2014

The publisher of The Journal of Neuroscience has laid out plans for an open-access, online-only journal for brain research.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

0 Comments

image: Defining Legit Open Access Journals

Defining Legit Open Access Journals

By | December 20, 2013

Scholarly publishing organizations join forces to set standards for aboveboard open access journals.  

0 Comments

image: GMO Retraction Sparks Retribution

GMO Retraction Sparks Retribution

By | December 5, 2013

A journal faces a potential lawsuit and a boycott after retracting a study about genetically modified crops.

6 Comments

image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

0 Comments

image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Honorary Authorship Is Antiquated Etiquette

Opinion: Honorary Authorship Is Antiquated Etiquette

By | October 16, 2013

Though the practice may be well-intentioned, naming courtesy authors can hurt science and scientists.

3 Comments

image: Useless Peer Review?

Useless Peer Review?

By | October 15, 2013

A study shows that the methods by which scientists evaluate each other’s work are error-prone and poor at measuring merit.

3 Comments

Advertisement
RayBiotech
RayBiotech

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Too Many Mitochondrial Genome Papers
  2. Antibiotics and the Gut Microbiome
  3. Sex Differences in Pain Pathway
  4. The Sum of Our Parts
    Features The Sum of Our Parts

    Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

Advertisement
Shimadzu Scientific
Shimadzu Scientific
Advertisement
The Scientist