The Scientist

» publishing and developmental biology

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image: Repeat Offenders

Repeat Offenders

By | April 25, 2016

Scanning the literature, scientists find that nearly 2 percent of papers contain duplicated and manipulated figures, among other image-prep no-nos.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: ORCID Rising

ORCID Rising

By | January 8, 2016

Publishers and scientific societies will require researchers to identify themselves using unique numeric codes.

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image: TS Picks: December 3, 2015

TS Picks: December 3, 2015

By | December 3, 2015

Inducing brain infections to cure cancer?; new journal publishes bit science; priming the brain for language learning

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image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: A Literature Database with Smarts

A Literature Database with Smarts

By | November 3, 2015

Semantic Scholar uses machine reading and vision to extract meaning and impact from academic papers.

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