Advertisement

The Scientist

» publishing and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: NIH Tackles Irreproducibility

NIH Tackles Irreproducibility

By | January 28, 2014

The federal agency speaks out about how to improve the quality of scientific research.

5 Comments

image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

0 Comments

image: New Neuroscience Journal to Launch

New Neuroscience Journal to Launch

By | January 15, 2014

The publisher of The Journal of Neuroscience has laid out plans for an open-access, online-only journal for brain research.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

0 Comments

image: Defining Legit Open Access Journals

Defining Legit Open Access Journals

By | December 20, 2013

Scholarly publishing organizations join forces to set standards for aboveboard open access journals.  

0 Comments

image: GMO Retraction Sparks Retribution

GMO Retraction Sparks Retribution

By | December 5, 2013

A journal faces a potential lawsuit and a boycott after retracting a study about genetically modified crops.

6 Comments

image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

0 Comments

image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Honorary Authorship Is Antiquated Etiquette

Opinion: Honorary Authorship Is Antiquated Etiquette

By | October 16, 2013

Though the practice may be well-intentioned, naming courtesy authors can hurt science and scientists.

3 Comments

image: Useless Peer Review?

Useless Peer Review?

By | October 15, 2013

A study shows that the methods by which scientists evaluate each other’s work are error-prone and poor at measuring merit.

3 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Too Many Mitochondrial Genome Papers
  2. Neanderthal-Human Hybrid Unearthed
  3. Sex Differences in Pain Pathway
  4. Antibiotics and the Gut Microbiome
Advertisement
Eppendorf
Eppendorf
Advertisement
The Scientist