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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Parsing Negative Citations

Parsing Negative Citations

By | October 26, 2015

A new tool helps scientists better understand what happens to studies that are criticized in the literature.

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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image: Debating the Value of Anonymity

Debating the Value of Anonymity

By | October 5, 2015

PubPeer responds to criticism that anonymous post-publication peer review threatens the scientific process.

1 Comment

image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

1 Comment

image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

27 Comments

image: “WikiGate” Ruffles OA Feathers

“WikiGate” Ruffles OA Feathers

By | September 16, 2015

A partnership between Wikipedia and scholarly publishing behemoth Elsevier has open-access advocates up in arms.

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image: Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

Opinion: Pay-to-Play Publishing

By | September 3, 2015

Online scientific journals are sacrificing the quality of research articles to make a buck.

3 Comments

image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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