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image: Sea Star Comeback?

Sea Star Comeback?

By | May 9, 2016

Hordes of baby sea stars on the Pacific coast survived the summer and winter of 2015—promising news about populations that have been devastated by a wasting disease.

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image: Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

By | May 5, 2016

Maternal antibodies engender a receptive gut environment for beneficial bacteria in newborn mice.

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image: New Journal Scrutinizes the Research Process

New Journal Scrutinizes the Research Process

By | May 3, 2016

Studies in Research Integrity and Peer Review analyze ethics and quality in both science and publishing.

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image: Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

By | May 2, 2016

Breaking down lengthy, narrative-driven biomedical articles into brief reports on singular observations or experiments could increase reproducibility and accessibility in the literature.

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image: Transparency Now

Transparency Now

By | May 1, 2016

Science is messy. So lay it out, warts and all.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | May 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Zombie Literature

The Zombie Literature

By | May 1, 2016

Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

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image: Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys

Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys

By | April 29, 2016

Infusing anti-HIV antibodies provides macaques with protection against infection for up to six months, according to a study.

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image: Repeat Offenders

Repeat Offenders

By | April 25, 2016

Scanning the literature, scientists find that nearly 2 percent of papers contain duplicated and manipulated figures, among other image-prep no-nos.

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image: “Hunger Hormone” No More?

“Hunger Hormone” No More?

By | April 20, 2016

Ghrelin promotes fat storage not feeding, according to a study.

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