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image: Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

By | May 2, 2016

Breaking down lengthy, narrative-driven biomedical articles into brief reports on singular observations or experiments could increase reproducibility and accessibility in the literature.

3 Comments

image: Transparency Now

Transparency Now

By | May 1, 2016

Science is messy. So lay it out, warts and all.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | May 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Zombie Literature

The Zombie Literature

By | May 1, 2016

Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

9 Comments

image: Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys

Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys

By | April 29, 2016

Infusing anti-HIV antibodies provides macaques with protection against infection for up to six months, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Repeat Offenders

Repeat Offenders

By | April 25, 2016

Scanning the literature, scientists find that nearly 2 percent of papers contain duplicated and manipulated figures, among other image-prep no-nos.

1 Comment

image: “Hunger Hormone” No More?

“Hunger Hormone” No More?

By | April 20, 2016

Ghrelin promotes fat storage not feeding, according to a study.

3 Comments

image: Theranos in Criminal Probe

Theranos in Criminal Probe

By | April 19, 2016

Federal officials are investigating whether the diagnostics company misled investors.

2 Comments

image: Tracking Zika’s Evolution

Tracking Zika’s Evolution

By | April 15, 2016

Sequence analysis of 41 viral strains reveals more than a half-century of change. 

1 Comment

image: Psychedelic Neuroimaging

Psychedelic Neuroimaging

By | April 13, 2016

“Ego dissolution,” and other things that happen to the human brain on LSD

0 Comments

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