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image: BMC Revises Retraction

BMC Revises Retraction

By | August 13, 2015

BioMed Central updates a retraction notice issued in March after finding out the authors did not influence the peer-review process.


image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.


image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.


image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.


image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century


image: Keeping Science Pubs Clean

Keeping Science Pubs Clean

By | June 29, 2015

Science releases new guidelines for research transparency, hoping to stem the tide of retractions and misconduct.


image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.


image: Device Trials Go Unpublished

Device Trials Go Unpublished

By | June 24, 2015

Just half of the clinical studies used to gain premarket approval for cardiac devices ever make it into the scientific literature.


image: Widespread Data Duplication

Widespread Data Duplication

By | June 17, 2015

Around one out of every four cancer papers scrutinized in a recent study contains questionable figures, and journals and authors aren’t responding to requests for clarification.


image: Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

By | June 1, 2015

The number of plagiarism-based retractions has grown since the advent of detection software, according to a BioMed Central analysis.


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