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image: Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

By , , and | November 18, 2016

A combination of the traditional metric and the newer h5 index potentiates the scientific community toward more-balanced evaluation. 

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Repairing Peer Review

Opinion: Repairing Peer Review

By | November 18, 2016

Peer review is in crisis, but should be fixed, not abolished.

2 Comments

image: Predicting Scientific Success

Predicting Scientific Success

By | November 3, 2016

A scientist’s most influential paper may come at any point in her career but chances are it won’t change her overall success, researchers show.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Stop Submitting Papers

Opinion: Stop Submitting Papers

By | October 13, 2016

This is not sustainable.

1 Comment

image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

4 Comments

image: Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

By | September 28, 2016

More papers correlate with top-cited research for more-established academics, but not newly minted professors, according to a study.  

3 Comments

image: Ocean Viruses Cataloged

Ocean Viruses Cataloged

By | September 21, 2016

An international research team triples the number of known virus types found in marine environments. 

0 Comments

Policymakers’ choice of seawater intakes highlights California’s troubling embrace of unproven technologies.

0 Comments

image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | September 7, 2016

Virus’s genome to aid in diagnoses; bees caught in crossfire of mosquito sprays; Zika spreads in Asia; US Congress revisits Zika funding

1 Comment

image: The History of Optogenetics Revised

The History of Optogenetics Revised

By | September 1, 2016

Credit for the neuroscience technique has largely overlooked the researcher who first demonstrated the method.

0 Comments

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