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image: ORCID Rising

ORCID Rising

By | January 8, 2016

Publishers and scientific societies will require researchers to identify themselves using unique numeric codes.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: TS Picks: December 3, 2015

TS Picks: December 3, 2015

By | December 3, 2015

Inducing brain infections to cure cancer?; new journal publishes bit science; priming the brain for language learning

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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: A Literature Database with Smarts

A Literature Database with Smarts

By | November 3, 2015

Semantic Scholar uses machine reading and vision to extract meaning and impact from academic papers.

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image: Parsing Negative Citations

Parsing Negative Citations

By | October 26, 2015

A new tool helps scientists better understand what happens to studies that are criticized in the literature.

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