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image: Opinion: Repairing Peer Review

Opinion: Repairing Peer Review

By | November 18, 2016

Peer review is in crisis, but should be fixed, not abolished.

2 Comments

image: Predicting Scientific Success

Predicting Scientific Success

By | November 3, 2016

A scientist’s most influential paper may come at any point in her career but chances are it won’t change her overall success, researchers show.

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image: Opinion: Stop Submitting Papers

Opinion: Stop Submitting Papers

By | October 13, 2016

This is not sustainable.

1 Comment

image: Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

By | September 28, 2016

More papers correlate with top-cited research for more-established academics, but not newly minted professors, according to a study.  

3 Comments

image: The History of Optogenetics Revised

The History of Optogenetics Revised

By | September 1, 2016

Credit for the neuroscience technique has largely overlooked the researcher who first demonstrated the method.

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image: Seven More Retractions for Cancer Researcher

Seven More Retractions for Cancer Researcher

By | August 10, 2016

All of the papers had been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Two Steps Toward Establishing Priority of Discovery

Opinion: Two Steps Toward Establishing Priority of Discovery

By | July 19, 2016

Establishing priority of a new finding is best achieved through a combination of a rapid, scientist-controlled disclosure followed by subsequent validation, through journal-based peer review and other mechanisms.

1 Comment

Researchers find that scientific papers with shorter titles accrue more citations only if they are very popular. For papers flying under the radar, longer titles fare better.

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image: New Journal Scrutinizes the Research Process

New Journal Scrutinizes the Research Process

By | May 3, 2016

Studies in Research Integrity and Peer Review analyze ethics and quality in both science and publishing.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

By | May 2, 2016

Breaking down lengthy, narrative-driven biomedical articles into brief reports on singular observations or experiments could increase reproducibility and accessibility in the literature.

3 Comments

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