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image: Surviving Acidity

Surviving Acidity

By | September 25, 2012

A new study reveals clues to the naked mole-rat’s ability to thrive in underground environments with high levels of carbon dioxide.

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image: Measuring Rabbit Pain

Measuring Rabbit Pain

By | September 10, 2012

Researchers develop a scale for rabbits, akin to the grimace scale used for laboratory mice, to help assess pain during routine lab procedures.

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image: Pleasant to the Touch

Pleasant to the Touch

By | September 1, 2012

Scientists hope an understanding of nerve fibers responsive only to gentle touch will give insight into the role the sense plays in social bonding.

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image: The Little Cell That Could

The Little Cell That Could

By | July 1, 2012

Critics point out that cell therapy has yet to top existing treatments. Biotech companies are setting out to change that—and prove that the technology can revolutionize medicine.

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image: Avant-Garde Science

Avant-Garde Science

By | June 1, 2012

Why naked mole-rats and experimental gene therapies remind me of groundbreaking artists.

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Contributors

June 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Digging the Underground Life

Digging the Underground Life

By | June 1, 2012

A rare peek inside the subterranean home of the naked mole-rat

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image: Pain Free

Pain Free

By | June 1, 2012

One of the naked mole-rat’s amazing qualities is the reduced ability to feel certain kinds of pain.

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image: Underground Supermodels

Underground Supermodels

By | June 1, 2012

What can a twentysomething naked mole-rat tell us about fighting pain, cancer, and aging?

12 Comments

image: Pain-Killing Transplants

Pain-Killing Transplants

By | May 23, 2012

Neurons injected into mice help treat chronic pain at its roots, rather than simply alleviating its symptoms.

1 Comment

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