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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: First US Penis Transplant

First US Penis Transplant

By | May 16, 2016

A man who lost his penis due to cancer has received the organ from a deceased donor.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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Colleagues of the surgeon under investigation distance themselves from a 2011 The Lancet study.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Surgery, Stem Cells Treat Cataracts

Surgery, Stem Cells Treat Cataracts

By | March 10, 2016

A surgical technique that removes the lens but leaves endogenous stem cells to allow lens regrowth shows promise in animal and early human trials.

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image: First Uterus Transplant in U.S.

First Uterus Transplant in U.S.

By | March 1, 2016

Less than six months after a woman in Sweden gave birth to a healthy baby from a transplanted womb, doctors in Cleveland begin a clinical trial to test the procedure in 10 US women.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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