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image: Week in Review: May 6 – 10

Week in Review: May 6 – 10

By | May 10, 2013

Telomeres and disease; Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may fight malaria; bat tongue mops nectar; newly sequenced genomes

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image: Ocean Floor Holds Ancient DNA

Ocean Floor Holds Ancient DNA

By | May 8, 2013

Genetic material recovered from sediment beneath the sea floor reveals ancient species not contained in the fossil record and could shed light on climate change.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 7, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Telomeres Affect Gene Expression

Telomeres Affect Gene Expression

By | May 5, 2013

As telomeres shorten with age, genes as far as 1,000 kilobases away could be affected, including one responsible for an inherited muscle disease.

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image: “Anonymous” Genomes Identified

“Anonymous” Genomes Identified

By | May 3, 2013

The names and addresses of people participating in the Personal Genome Project can be easily tracked down despite such data being left off their online profiles.

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image: Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

By | May 3, 2013

The brain’s role in aging; tracking disease; understanding the new flu virus; no autism-Lyme link; one drug’s journey from bench to bedside

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image: Bacterial Conduit

Bacterial Conduit

By | May 1, 2013

Desulfobulbaceae bacteria were recently discovered to form centimeter-long cables, containing thousands of cells that share an outer membrane.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | May 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Down for the Count

Down for the Count

By | May 1, 2013

One, two, three, four . . . . Counting colonies and plaques can be tedious, but tools exist to streamline the process.

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image: Electric Microbe Hairs

Electric Microbe Hairs

By | May 1, 2013

USC researcher Mohamed El-Naggar demonstrates how some bacteria grow electrical wires that allow them to link up in big biological circuits.

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