The Scientist

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image: When Stop Means Go

When Stop Means Go

By | May 22, 2014

A survey of trillions of base pairs of microbial DNA reveals a considerable degree of stop codon reassignment.

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image: Border Collies vs. <em>E. coli</em>

Border Collies vs. E. coli

By | May 21, 2014

A study shows that the herding dogs can be an effective means of controlling bacterial infections spread by seagulls.

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image: Birds of a Genome

Birds of a Genome

By | May 21, 2014

Married couples have more similar DNA than random pairs of people, a study shows.

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image: Characterizing the “Healthy” Vagina

Characterizing the “Healthy” Vagina

By | May 19, 2014

The overly simplistic notion of a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiome is giving way to an appreciation of diverse and dynamic bacterial communities.

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image: Back from the Blacklist?

Back from the Blacklist?

By | May 8, 2014

Disgraced psychology researcher Marc Hauser, who was found guilty of data fabrication and falsification during his time at Harvard, publishes two new papers.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | May 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2014 issue of The Scientist

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: The Skin We’re In

The Skin We’re In

By | May 1, 2014

Beneath maladies of the skin lie psychosocial stigma and pain.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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