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image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

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image: Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

By | May 4, 2016

A new analysis of microbial data estimates that the world is home to 1 trillion species—of which only 0.001 percent have been discovered.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Animal Magnetism

Animal Magnetism

By | May 1, 2016

A photosensitive protein behind the retinas of cockroaches plays a role in light-dependent, directional magnetosensitivity.

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image: Becoming Acculturated

Becoming Acculturated

By | May 1, 2016

Techniques for deep dives into the microbial dark matter

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image: US Government to Repatriate Kennewick Man

US Government to Repatriate Kennewick Man

By | April 29, 2016

A 2015 ancient DNA study determined that the 8,500-year-old skeletal remains belonged to an individual of Native American ancestry. Now, the US Army Corp of Engineers has begun the process of returning the bones to their rightful owners.

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image: Microbial Ice-Makers

Microbial Ice-Makers

By | April 26, 2016

How one bacterium turns water into ice at nonfreezing temperatures

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image: Psychedelic Neuroimaging

Psychedelic Neuroimaging

By | April 13, 2016

“Ego dissolution,” and other things that happen to the human brain on LSD

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers create a new tree of life, largely composed of mystery bacteria.

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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