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image: The Body Electric, 1840s

The Body Electric, 1840s

By | November 1, 2014

Emil du Bois-Reymond’s innovations for recording electrical signals from living tissue set the stage for today’s neural monitoring techniques.

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image: The Rules of Replication

The Rules of Replication

By | November 1, 2014

Should there be standard protocols for how researchers attempt to reproduce the work of others?

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image: Uncommonly Rare

Uncommonly Rare

By | November 1, 2014

How one of the rarest neurodegenerative diseases could lend insight into ubiquitous neuroprotective processes

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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image: 2014 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2014 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2014

This year’s data reveal notable variation in compensation for life scientists working in different fields, sectors, and regions of the world.

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image: A Face to Remember

A Face to Remember

By | November 1, 2014

Once dominated by correlational studies, face-perception research is moving into the realm of experimentation—and gaining tremendous insight.

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image: Neuroprosthetics

Neuroprosthetics

By , , and | November 1, 2014

Linking the human nervous system to computers is providing unprecedented control of artificial limbs and restoring lost sensory function.

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image: Leader in Birdsong Research Dies

Leader in Birdsong Research Dies

By | October 29, 2014

Allison Doupe, a neuroscientist known for her work exploring the neural mechanisms of learning, has passed away.

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image: Still There

Still There

By | October 20, 2014

Researchers identify brain activity patterns that may indicate when an unresponsive patient is conscious.

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image: Neuro-Insights into Holding It

Neuro-Insights into Holding It

By | October 17, 2014

Scientists reveal the neural underpinnings—and muscles tightly linked with—the involuntary flexing of the pelvic floor, which comprises muscles that help us delay urination.

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