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image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Ancient DNA Sheds Light on Peopling of Americas

Ancient DNA Sheds Light on Peopling of Americas

By | October 28, 2015

An analysis of centuries-old genetic material from two infants who lived near the Bering Strait suggests that people came to North America in a single wave from Asia about 25,000 years ago.

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image: Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

By | October 27, 2015

The World Health Organization recommends more pilot trials.

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image: Bronze Age Plague Sequenced

Bronze Age Plague Sequenced

By | October 26, 2015

Plague-causing bacteria may have been around as early as 5,000 years ago, though a genomic analysis suggests that ancient strains were less contagious.

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image: B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers identify a subset of proinflammatory cytokine-producing B cells that may spark multiple sclerosis-related inflammation.  

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image: Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers design antibody-like proteins to awaken and destroy HIV holdouts.

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image: Microbiome Meals

Microbiome Meals

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers identify a handful of genes that help bacteria in the mouse gut adapt to dietary changes.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Cultural Riches

Cultural Riches

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers devise new techniques to facilitate growing bacteria collected from the environment.

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image: Lost Colonies

Lost Colonies

By | October 1, 2015

Next-generation sequencing has identified scores of new microorganisms, but getting even abundant bacterial species to grow in the lab has proven challenging.

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