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image: The Neanderthal in the Mirror

The Neanderthal in the Mirror

By | August 1, 2016

Our evolutionary cousin is no longer a blundering caveman. Recent research has painted a picture of a human ancestor with culture, art, and advanced cognitive skills.

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image: Fossilized Feces Reveal Silk Road Parasites

Fossilized Feces Reveal Silk Road Parasites

By | July 25, 2016

Scientists have found the first evidence of these organisms on ancient “hygiene sticks.”

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Blood Sugar</em>

Book Excerpt from Blood Sugar

By | July 1, 2016

Author Anthony Ryan Hatch relays his personal experience with metabolic syndrome.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

By | July 1, 2016

Scientists who study the lifestyle disorder must do a better job of incorporating political and social science into their work.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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image: Underwater “City” Built by Microbes

Underwater “City” Built by Microbes

By | June 7, 2016

Columns and pavement-like structures found in the Ionian Sea were built by bacteria.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Dog Domestication History Clarified

Dog Domestication History Clarified

By | June 3, 2016

A study suggests that wolves were transformed into man’s best friend more than once, in Asia and in Europe or the Near East.

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