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image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

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image: Let's Make a Deal

Let's Make a Deal

By | February 1, 2013

Six myths about job and salary negotiations and how they may hinder your ability to bargain effectively.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2013

February 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: The A@#hole Scientist

The A@#hole Scientist

By | February 1, 2013

Can a vexing sense of entitlement actually aid in the pursuit of knowledge?

15 Comments

image: The Spoils of War

The Spoils of War

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers read the marks of intense warfare and conquest in the genes of ancient native North Americans.

4 Comments

image: Why Insects Should Be in Your Diet

Why Insects Should Be in Your Diet

By | February 1, 2013

Because of their high protein and fat content and their reproductive efficiency, insects hold great promise for thwarting an impending global food crisis.

15 Comments

image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Communication Crisis in Research

Opinion: Communication Crisis in Research

By | January 30, 2013

The problem threatens progress and stems from both a lack of attention to clear discourse and a scientific culture not focused on critical challenges.

9 Comments

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