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image: Book Excerpt from The Murder of Cleopatra

Book Excerpt from The Murder of Cleopatra

By | March 1, 2013

In Chapter 1, “The Coldest Case,” author and criminal profiler Pat Brown sets the scene for her quest to prove that the Egyptian queen did not commit suicide.

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Buying Cell-Culture Products

By | March 1, 2013

A survey of The Scientist readers reveals who buys cell-growth products from whom, and why.

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Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2013

The Undead, Frankenstein's Cat, The Universe Within, and Physics in Mind

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Coral Clocks

By | March 1, 2013

Uranium dating of coral tools used by the earliest settlers of the South Pacific island kingdom of Tonga offers unprecedented precision in reconstructing their history.

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Crack Control

By | March 1, 2013

Nanoscale cracks in bone dissipate energy to protect against fracture, a process that appears to be regulated by the interaction of two proteins.

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image: CSI: Ancient Alexandria

CSI: Ancient Alexandria

By | March 1, 2013

A reexamination of the facts surrounding the death of Cleopatra VII reveals that the Egyptian queen was murdered—and not by an asp.

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image: Set It and Forget It

Set It and Forget It

By | March 1, 2013

A tour of three systems for automating cell culture

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Sleep Protection

By | March 1, 2013

Inducing certain brain patterns extends non-REM sleep in mice.

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Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2013

March 2013's selection of notable quotes

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Science on Celluloid

By | February 28, 2013

Scientist? Filmmaker? Alexis Gambis welcomes both labels.

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