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image: Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

By | March 3, 2013

Normal proteins with regions resembling disease-causing prions are responsible for an inherited disorder that affects the brain, muscle, and bone.

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image: Antibiotic Bouncer

Antibiotic Bouncer

By | March 1, 2013

Contrary to previous assumptions that macrolide antibiotics completely block the exit tunnel of ribosomes, new evidence shows that some peptides are allowed to pass.

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image: Biology Hacklabs

Biology Hacklabs

By | March 1, 2013

Fueled by donations, sweat, and occasional dumpster diving, community laboratories for DIY biologists are cropping up around the country.

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image: Book Excerpt from The Murder of Cleopatra

Book Excerpt from The Murder of Cleopatra

By | March 1, 2013

In Chapter 1, “The Coldest Case,” author and criminal profiler Pat Brown sets the scene for her quest to prove that the Egyptian queen did not commit suicide.

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image: Buying Cell-Culture Products

Buying Cell-Culture Products

By | March 1, 2013

A survey of The Scientist readers reveals who buys cell-growth products from whom, and why.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2013

The Undead, Frankenstein's Cat, The Universe Within, and Physics in Mind

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image: Coral Clocks

Coral Clocks

By | March 1, 2013

Uranium dating of coral tools used by the earliest settlers of the South Pacific island kingdom of Tonga offers unprecedented precision in reconstructing their history.

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image: Crack Control

Crack Control

By | March 1, 2013

Nanoscale cracks in bone dissipate energy to protect against fracture, a process that appears to be regulated by the interaction of two proteins.

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image: CSI: Ancient Alexandria

CSI: Ancient Alexandria

By | March 1, 2013

A reexamination of the facts surrounding the death of Cleopatra VII reveals that the Egyptian queen was murdered—and not by an asp.

2 Comments

image: Set It and Forget It

Set It and Forget It

By | March 1, 2013

A tour of three systems for automating cell culture

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