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image: Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

By | November 24, 2014

The cold-tolerant cereal crop allowed humans to live and farm higher than ever starting more than 3,000 years ago.

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image: Mapping the Human Proteome

Mapping the Human Proteome

By | November 10, 2014

A comprehensive map of human proteins throughout the body identifies the testes as home to the most unique blend of gene products.

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image: Enhanced Enhancers

Enhanced Enhancers

By | November 1, 2014

The recent discovery of super-enhancers may offer new drug targets for a range of diseases.

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image: Mitochondria Munchers

Mitochondria Munchers

By | November 1, 2014

Glial cells consume mitochondria released by neurons in the optic nerve.

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image: Tumor Exosomes Make microRNAs

Tumor Exosomes Make microRNAs

By | October 27, 2014

Cellular blebs shed by tumor cells can process short stretches of RNA that go on to induce tumor formation in neighboring cells.

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image: Lab-Made Insulin-Secreting Cells

Lab-Made Insulin-Secreting Cells

By | October 13, 2014

Researchers craft hormone-producing pancreas cells from human embryonic stem cells, paving the way for a cell therapy to treat diabetes.

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image: Mom’s Mitochondria Affect Pup Longevity

Mom’s Mitochondria Affect Pup Longevity

By | October 9, 2014

Mitochondrial mutations inherited from the mother can shorten a mouse’s lifespan.

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image: Cone Cell Correctors

Cone Cell Correctors

By | October 1, 2014

In mice, adult cone cell outer segments and their visual functions deteriorate if two microRNAs are not present.

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image: Nuclear Cartography

Nuclear Cartography

By | October 1, 2014

Techniques for mapping chromosome conformation

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image: Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

By | September 25, 2014

Using citation statistics, the firm forecasts which researchers are likely to take home science’s top honors this year.

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