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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

By | June 15, 2015

This helps the insects collect as much visual information as possible from the gently swaying flowers on which they dine.

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image: The Roots of Schizophrenia

The Roots of Schizophrenia

By | June 4, 2015

Researchers link disease-associated mutations to excitatory and inhibitory signaling in the brain.

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image: Brain Drain

Brain Drain

By | June 1, 2015

The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: New Legs to Stand On

New Legs to Stand On

By | June 1, 2015

Reconstructing the past using ancient DNA

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image: Lost Memories Reactivated in Mice

Lost Memories Reactivated in Mice

By | May 29, 2015

Using optogenetics, researchers excite selected neurons to reinstate a fear memory that had been blocked.

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image: Gene Linked to Pain Insensitivity

Gene Linked to Pain Insensitivity

By | May 27, 2015

People with a congenital disorder that makes them unable to feel pain have mutations in a histone-modifying gene. 

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image: Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

By | May 26, 2015

Researchers unearth 3.3 million-year-old stone flakes in Kenya, forcing a reimagining of the emergence of such technologies in the ancestors of humans.

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image: Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

By | May 21, 2015

Squid, cuttlefish, and octopuses possess vision machinery in their skin.

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