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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 7, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Jamestown Settlers Practiced Cannibalism

Jamestown Settlers Practiced Cannibalism

By | May 2, 2013

Newly discovered remains provide the first hard evidence that the ill-fated colonists of the 17th century resorted to eating human flesh when their food supply ran out.

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image: Ancient Appearances

Ancient Appearances

By | May 1, 2013

A new DNA assay developed by forensic scientists helps archaeologists reconstruct eye and hair color from old teeth and bones.

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In Chapter 4, “Darwin’s Barnacles, Agassiz’s Jellyfish,” author Christoph Irmscher describes his subject’s obsession with marine organisms.

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image: Flying Frog, 1855

Flying Frog, 1855

By | May 1, 2013

Alfred Russel Wallace, Darwin’s unheralded codiscoverer of the theory of evolution by natural selection, found inspiration in the specimens he collected on his travels.

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Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2013

May 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: The King of Turtles

The King of Turtles

By | May 1, 2013

American naturalist Louis Agassiz had a zeal for collecting that encouraged a nation to engage with nature.

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image: Humans Under Pressure

Humans Under Pressure

By | April 25, 2013

Better health care in Gambian villages lead to flip-flopping selection pressures on height and weight.

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image: Naturalist’s House for Sale

Naturalist’s House for Sale

By | April 22, 2013

One of the surviving UK homes of pioneering but long-overlooked evolutionary theorist Alfred Russel Wallace is on the market.

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image: Did Inbreeding Royals Evolve?

Did Inbreeding Royals Evolve?

By | April 22, 2013

A new study suggests that in the Spanish Habsburg royal family, natural selection may have diminished the most harmful effects of inbreeding.

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