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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

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image: The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases

The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases

By | July 1, 2016

Techniques for determining which genes or genetic variants are truly detrimental

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image: Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

By | June 27, 2016

Reptiles, birds, and mammals all produce tiny, bump-like structures during development.   

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image: Transmissible Cancers Plague Mollusks

Transmissible Cancers Plague Mollusks

By | June 22, 2016

Researchers identify three new examples of infectious cancers affecting these invertebrates.

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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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image: Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

By | June 9, 2016

Researchers repurpose a bacterial immune system to be a molecular recording device.

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image: Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

By | June 9, 2016

Fish evolved to make their own light at least 27 times, according to a study.

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image: Underwater “City” Built by Microbes

Underwater “City” Built by Microbes

By | June 7, 2016

Columns and pavement-like structures found in the Ionian Sea were built by bacteria.

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A transposon underlies this classic story of evolutionary adaptation.

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