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image: TB Traces

TB Traces

By | August 1, 2015

Take a trip to the mummy museum in Vác, Hungary, to see the human remains that helped researchers learn more about the origins of tuberculosis in Europe.

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image: Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

Oldest Stone Tools Discovered

By | May 26, 2015

Researchers unearth 3.3 million-year-old stone flakes in Kenya, forcing a reimagining of the emergence of such technologies in the ancestors of humans.

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image: Researchers Unearth Cervantes’s Tomb

Researchers Unearth Cervantes’s Tomb

By | March 19, 2015

A convent in Madrid may contain some of the Spanish literary giant’s remains, forensic experts say.

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image: Corn Chronicle

Corn Chronicle

By | January 8, 2015

A genetic analysis of ancient and modern maize clarifies the crop’s checkered domestication history.

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image: Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found

Oldest Abstract Etching Yet Found

By | December 5, 2014

Archaeologists report that a shell with geometric engravings was carved by a Homo erectus hundreds of thousands of years ago.

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image: Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

By | November 24, 2014

The cold-tolerant cereal crop allowed humans to live and farm higher than ever starting more than 3,000 years ago.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse #3

The Scientist on The Pulse #3

By | January 28, 2014

Kerry Grens chats about ancient tooth decay, asthma, and fat cells.

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image: Dating the Origin of Us

Dating the Origin of Us

By | November 1, 2013

Theoretical anthropogeny seeks to understand how Homo sapiens rose to a position of global dominance.

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image: A Bone-Deep Kinship

A Bone-Deep Kinship

By | September 1, 2013

A Neanderthal rib fragment provides conclusive evidence that the ancient hominins were susceptible to a benign bone tumor of modern humans.

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image: Jamestown Settlers Practiced Cannibalism

Jamestown Settlers Practiced Cannibalism

By | May 2, 2013

Newly discovered remains provide the first hard evidence that the ill-fated colonists of the 17th century resorted to eating human flesh when their food supply ran out.

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