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PerkinElmer

The Scientist

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

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Caught on Camera

By | May 1, 2014

Selected Images of the Day from www.the-scientist.com

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Contributors

By , and | May 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2014 issue of The Scientist

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image: The Skin We’re In

The Skin We’re In

By | May 1, 2014

Beneath maladies of the skin lie psychosocial stigma and pain.

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Neuroaesthetics

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unravel the biology of beauty and art.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | April 28, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: How Artistic Brains Differ

How Artistic Brains Differ

By | April 18, 2014

A study reveals structural differences between the brains of artists and non-artists.

3 Comments

image: Bridging Two Worlds

Bridging Two Worlds

By | April 4, 2014

Lynne Quarmby’s love of the natural world inspires her to explore beyond her cell biology lab through art.

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image: Lynne Quarmby - Artist

Lynne Quarmby - Artist

By | April 4, 2014

The professor of molecular biology and biochemistry at Simon Fraser University is also an accomplished painter.

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image: The Structure of Flowers

The Structure of Flowers

By | April 4, 2014

Architecture student-turned-artist Macato Murayama creates beautiful images inspired by the intricate anatomy of flowers.

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