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image: Opinion: Evolving Engineering

Opinion: Evolving Engineering

By | October 1, 2011

Exploiting the unique properties of living systems makes synthetic biologists better engineers.

3 Comments

image: Opinion: Synthesizing Life

Opinion: Synthesizing Life

By | October 1, 2011

Designing genomes from scratch will be the next revolution in biology.

12 Comments

image: Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

By | October 1, 2011

Researchers studying differences in how individuals respond to stress are finding that genes are malleable and environments can be deterministic.

12 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Future Science: Essays From the Cutting Edge</em>

Book Excerpt from Future Science: Essays From the Cutting Edge

By | October 1, 2011

In an essay entitled "Nurture, Nature, and the Stress That is Life," neurobiologists Darlene Francis and Daniela Kaufer envision a future where science moves past the nature vs. nurture debate in considering differences in human behavioral responses to stress.

0 Comments

image: Interview: Speaking of Memory

Interview: Speaking of Memory

By | October 1, 2011

Considered a renegade by his peers, Nobel Prize-winner Eric Kandel used a simple model to probe the neural circuitry of memory.

9 Comments

image: Marauding Moths

Marauding Moths

By | October 1, 2011

Dried plant specimens reveal the origin of an insect pest that has spread throughout Europe.

0 Comments

image: Tinkering With Life

Tinkering With Life

By | October 1, 2011

A decade’s worth of engineering-infused biology

18 Comments

image: Traffic Cops

Traffic Cops

By | October 1, 2011

Editor's Choice in Cell Biology

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image: Synthetic Biology

Synthetic Biology

By , , and | October 1, 2011

Learn about the field’s first genetic circuits and read forecasts by George M. Church and J. Craig Venter of a future where man-made organisms pump out novel fuels, drugs, and therapies.

0 Comments

image: Missegregation Linked to DNA Damage

Missegregation Linked to DNA Damage

By | September 29, 2011

Researchers show that errors in chromosome segregation known to cause chromosome instability can also lead to gene translocations, insertions, or deletions.

9 Comments

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