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» stress and developmental biology

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image: The Tradeoff of Stress

The Tradeoff of Stress

By | December 15, 2011

For nematode worms, a bigger stress response means a healthier, longer life, but fewer babies.

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image: The Comfort Food Drug

The Comfort Food Drug

By | December 9, 2011

Researchers found that stress eating can blunt the body’s stress response.

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image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

3 Comments

image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42

5 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

3 Comments

image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

image: Prenatal Stress Ages Offspring

Prenatal Stress Ages Offspring

By | November 9, 2011

High stress during fetal development could  cause premature aging, according to a study in chickens, which published today (November 9) in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 

6 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | October 17, 2011

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

3 Comments

image: Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

By | October 1, 2011

Researchers studying differences in how individuals respond to stress are finding that genes are malleable and environments can be deterministic.

12 Comments

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