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» stress and developmental biology

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

1 Comment

image: How Stress Affects Cancer’s Spread

How Stress Affects Cancer’s Spread

By | March 1, 2016

A mouse study reveals how chronic stress remodels lymphatic vasculature to facilitate the spread of tumor cells.

3 Comments

image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Blocking a Stress-Related Gene Relieves Chronic Pain

Blocking a Stress-Related Gene Relieves Chronic Pain

By | February 10, 2016

Inhibiting the activity of a protein involved in the body’s stress response can ease chronic pain in mice.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes

Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes

By | November 25, 2015

Molecular markers could aid researchers’ assessment of patient response to the drug.  

4 Comments

image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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