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image: Pregnancy Stress Spans Generations

Pregnancy Stress Spans Generations

By | August 7, 2014

The stressors a female rat experiences during pregnancy can have repercussions for her granddaughters, a study shows. 

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image: Stressing and FRETing

Stressing and FRETing

By | August 1, 2014

Two labs have produced FRET-based systems for real-time analysis of a plant stress hormone.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Week in Review: April 28–May 2

Week in Review: April 28–May 2

By | May 2, 2014

Male scientists stress mice out; using SCNT to reprogram adult cells; acetate can reach mouse brain, reduce appetite; WHO sounds “post-antibiotic era” alarm

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Week in Review: April 14–18

Week in Review: April 14–18

By | April 18, 2014

Genome-wide effects of trisomy 21; RNA-based signs of transgenerational stress; depression and resilience; a call to overhaul US biomedical research system

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image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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image: Traces of Trauma in Sperm RNA

Traces of Trauma in Sperm RNA

By | April 13, 2014

A mouse study shows that molecular remnants of early-life stress can be passed on to future generations.

3 Comments

image: Telomeres Show Signs of Early-Life Stress

Telomeres Show Signs of Early-Life Stress

By | April 7, 2014

Reduction in telomere length is associated with stress early on in life and may have a genetic component, researchers find.

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