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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Upside of Early-Life Stress?

Upside of Early-Life Stress?

By | November 18, 2014

Mice raised under stressful conditions are more adaptable as adults—and may pass this trait on to their pups.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Muscle to Mind

Muscle to Mind

By | September 25, 2014

Exercise-induced muscle metabolites protect the brain from stress-induced depression in a mouse model. 

2 Comments

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Pregnancy Stress Spans Generations

Pregnancy Stress Spans Generations

By | August 7, 2014

The stressors a female rat experiences during pregnancy can have repercussions for her granddaughters, a study shows. 

2 Comments

image: Stressing and FRETing

Stressing and FRETing

By | August 1, 2014

Two labs have produced FRET-based systems for real-time analysis of a plant stress hormone.

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