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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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The plant Lophophytum pilfers mitochondrial genes from the species it parasitizes.

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image: ACMG Urges Caution When Editing Embryo Genomes

ACMG Urges Caution When Editing Embryo Genomes

By | January 30, 2017

The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics calls on scientists and health care providers to engage in public discussion about the ethical issues involved in genome editing. 

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image: Improving Tomato Flavor, Genetically

Improving Tomato Flavor, Genetically

By | January 26, 2017

A sequencing blitz on the tomato genome reveals the genes that contribute most to tastiness.

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image: Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

By | January 23, 2017

Researchers generate an organism that can replicate artificial base pairs indefinitely.

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image: How Traffic Noise Affects Tree Frogs

How Traffic Noise Affects Tree Frogs

By | January 18, 2017

Constant exposure to the sounds of a busy road can impact a male European tree frog’s stress levels, immune system, and vocal sac coloration, scientists show.

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A cell phone–based microscope can identify mutations in tumor tissue and image products of DNA sequencing reactions.

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image: Ancient Origins of Retroviruses

Ancient Origins of Retroviruses

By | January 12, 2017

Foamy-like endogenous retroviruses may have emerged more than 450 million years ago, according to an analysis.

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