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Thirty percent of bacteria found in babies' guts came from mothers' milk, a study finds.

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image: Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

By | May 8, 2017

Bacterial differences after three-month temperature hikes, modeled after global warming predictions, were evident one year later, a study found.

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image: Mouse Livers Grow and Shrink Daily

Mouse Livers Grow and Shrink Daily

By | May 4, 2017

Feeding-fasting rhythms and light-dark cycles direct regular changes in organ and cell size, as well as ribosome number and protein levels.

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image: Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

By | May 1, 2017

Researchers are redesigning the humble brick to produce electricity, to clean water and air, and to harvest valuable compounds.

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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

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Mice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.

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Scientists identify a mutation in the CRY1 gene in people with abnormal sleeping patterns.

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Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

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image: Circadian Rhythms Influence Treatment Effects

Circadian Rhythms Influence Treatment Effects

By | April 1, 2017

Across many diseases, taking medication at specific times of day may make the therapy more effective.

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