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image: Brain Prize Winners Announced

Brain Prize Winners Announced

By | March 3, 2016

Three UK neuroscientists jointly win the €1 million European Brain Prize for their work on memory.

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image: Cave Dwellers, 1938

Cave Dwellers, 1938

By | March 1, 2016

Renowned sleep researcher Nathaniel Kleitman and a colleague spent a month underground to test the body’s natural rhythms.

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image: Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

By | March 1, 2016

Research Fellow, Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liège. Age: 35

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: In Your Dreams

In Your Dreams

By | March 1, 2016

Understanding the sleeping brain may be the key to unlocking the secrets of the human mind.

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image: Learning with the Lights Out

Learning with the Lights Out

By | March 1, 2016

Researchers are uncovering the link between sleep and learning and how it changes throughout our lives.

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image: Out in the Cold

Out in the Cold

By | March 1, 2016

Serotonin’s long-debated role in sleep promotion is temperature-dependent.

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image: Sleep Circuit

Sleep Circuit

By | March 1, 2016

A web of cell types in one of the brain’s chief wake centers keeps animals up—but also puts them to sleep.

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image: Sugar Time

Sugar Time

By | March 1, 2016

Metabolic activity, not light, drives the circadian clock in cyanobacteria.

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image: The A B Zzzzs

The A B Zzzzs

By | March 1, 2016

An overview of the human sleep cycle

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