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image: Targeted Information in the Rat Brain

Targeted Information in the Rat Brain

By | April 30, 2015

A study shows that the hippocampus selects which information to send, and where, during different behaviors.

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image: One-Man Tinnitus Map

One-Man Tinnitus Map

By | April 26, 2015

Researchers probe the neural roots of the ear-ringing condition in a man undergoing brain surgery.

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image: Circadian Responses to Chemo

Circadian Responses to Chemo

By | April 21, 2015

After exposure to curcumin, rat cancer cell populations undergo a daily cycle of cell death.

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image: Circadian Clock Controls Sugar Metabolism

Circadian Clock Controls Sugar Metabolism

By | April 17, 2015

The body’s circadian rhythm has more of an effect on glucose tolerance than one’s eating and sleeping patterns, a study shows.  

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image: Gut Microbes Influence Circadian Clock

Gut Microbes Influence Circadian Clock

By | April 16, 2015

Metabolites produced by gut microbes in mice can affect the animals’ circadian rhythm and metabolism. 

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image: Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

By | April 14, 2015

Deep-brain stimulation may effectively treat slow movement, tremor, and rigidity in Parkinson’s patients by reducing synchronicity of neural activity in the motor cortex.

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image: A Spider's Eye View

A Spider's Eye View

By | April 1, 2015

Cornell researchers probe the brains of jumping spiders to gain insight into the arachnid's visual processing capabilities.

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image: Through a Spider’s Eyes

Through a Spider’s Eyes

By | April 1, 2015

Deciphering how a jumping spider sees the world and processes visual information may yield insights into long-standing robotics problems.

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image: Pain and Itch Neurons Found

Pain and Itch Neurons Found

By | March 31, 2015

Inhibitory nerve cells in the spinal cord stop the transmission of pain and itch signals in mice.

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image: Opinion: Can the Brain Be Trained?

Opinion: Can the Brain Be Trained?

By | March 23, 2015

Online brain-training is gaining popularity, but so far little evidence exists to support claims of improved cognition.

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