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Scientists identify a mutation in the CRY1 gene in people with abnormal sleeping patterns.

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image: Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

By | April 7, 2017

After an inflammatory injury occurs in the brain, astrocytes release extracellular vesicles that travel to the liver and trigger an immune response.

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image: Circadian Rhythms Influence Treatment Effects

Circadian Rhythms Influence Treatment Effects

By | April 1, 2017

Across many diseases, taking medication at specific times of day may make the therapy more effective.

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image: Infographic: Circadian Clock Affects Health and Disease

Infographic: Circadian Clock Affects Health and Disease

By | April 1, 2017

The body's rhythms could affect numerous ailments as well as how people respond to treatments.

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image: Paralyzed Man Moves Arm with Neuroprosthetic

Paralyzed Man Moves Arm with Neuroprosthetic

By | March 30, 2017

Two chips implanted in a quadriplegic patient’s motor cortex and 36 electrodes in his right arm allow the man to control the movement of his right arm and hand.

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The University of Rhode Island neurotoxicologist and dean came to the U.S. for college in the 1980s. 

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image: Glia Help Regulate Circadian Behaviors

Glia Help Regulate Circadian Behaviors

By | March 23, 2017

Scientists confirm that astrocytes are involved in regulating molecular and behavioral circadian rhythms in mice. 

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image: Consilience, Episode 2: In Tune

Consilience, Episode 2: In Tune

By | March 21, 2017

Ben Henry delves into the still-unanswered questions of where our musical preferences come from and what makes synesthetes tick.

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image: Oxford University to Study Marijuana

Oxford University to Study Marijuana

By | March 20, 2017

Academics partner with a biotech firm to investigate cannabinoids and develop potential therapeutics.

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image: Singing Through Tone Deafness

Singing Through Tone Deafness

By | March 17, 2017

Author Tim Falconer didn't take his congenital amusia lying down. With the help of neuroscientists and vocal coaches, he tried to teach himself to sing against all odds.

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