The Scientist

» circadian clocks and neuroscience

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image: Go To Bed!

Go To Bed!

By | March 1, 2016

The immediate consequences of losing out on sleep may be harbingers of long-term repercussions.


image: Sleep’s Kernel

Sleep’s Kernel

By and | March 1, 2016

Surprisingly small sections of brain, and even neuronal and glial networks in a dish, display many electrical indicators of sleep.

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image: A Month in Mammoth

A Month in Mammoth

By | March 1, 2016

Two sleep researchers braved the subterranean environment of a Kentucky cave to see if they could train their bodies to abandon the cyclical rhythms of the 24-hour day.


image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

By | February 17, 2016

What does blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging actually tell us about brain activity? 


image: More Mini Brains

More Mini Brains

By | February 17, 2016

Simple versions of brain organoids could serve as new models for testing the effects of drugs, researchers reported at this year’s AAAS meeting. 


image: Circadian Clock and Aging

Circadian Clock and Aging

By | February 3, 2016

Whether a critical circadian clock gene is deleted before or after birth impacts the observed aging-related effects in mice.


image: Hormone Hangover

Hormone Hangover

By | February 1, 2016

Medication to prevent prematurity in humans harms cognitive flexibility in rats.


image: Infection-Autism Link Explained?

Infection-Autism Link Explained?

By | January 31, 2016

A mouse study suggests a mechanism by which severe infections during pregnancy increase autism risk. 


image: Schizophrenia and the Synapse

Schizophrenia and the Synapse

By | January 27, 2016

Genetic evidence suggests that overactive synaptic pruning drives development of schizophrenia.


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