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» circadian clocks and immunology

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: Rhythmic Rewiring

Rhythmic Rewiring

By | November 1, 2014

Circadian neurons in fruit flies form synapses with different, noncircadian brain regions depending on the time of day.

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image: Circadian Atlas Chronicles Gene Expression

Circadian Atlas Chronicles Gene Expression

By | October 27, 2014

Researchers have mapped the times of day when mouse genes are transcribed across 12 organs.

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image: Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

By | October 17, 2014

Frequent airplane travel may contribute to obesity by throwing off circadian rhythms and changing the composition of the intestinal microbiome, according to a new study.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time

Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time

By | September 25, 2014

Tetra fish adapted to extreme darkness lose circadian metabolic rhythms to conserve energy, according to a study. 

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image: Prepped for the Long Sleep

Prepped for the Long Sleep

By | July 30, 2014

Hibernation-related proteins are common even in non-hibernating animals, a study shows.

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image: Light’s Dark Side

Light’s Dark Side

By | July 25, 2014

Exposure to dim light at night speeds the growth of human breast cancer tumors implanted into rats and makes the cancer resistant to the drug tamoxifen.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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