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» circadian clocks and immunology

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image: Tidal Clocks

Tidal Clocks

By | September 27, 2013

Some marine organisms have internal rhythms that cycle with the tides and are independent of circadian rhythms.

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image: Out of Sync

Out of Sync

By | September 1, 2013

Why eating at the wrong times is tied to such profound and negative effects on our bodies

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image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

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image: Mind the Clock

Mind the Clock

By | September 1, 2013

Many of the body's tissues can tell time, and these peripheral clocks can be influenced by environmental cues, such as the timing of food consumption.

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image: Electric Lights Alter Daily Rhythms

Electric Lights Alter Daily Rhythms

By | August 6, 2013

Humans’ circadian clocks become skewed when they are exposed to electric lights but revert to a schedule more in tune with the sun when they go camping.

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image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | July 8, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

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image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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