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Research Behind Bars

By | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.

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Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

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Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

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image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

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image: Bird Bullies

Bird Bullies

By | June 1, 2013

Regular supplies of food for scavenger birds in Spain may not be the most effective conservation strategy, as smaller birds are bullied away.

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image: Decoding DNA: New Twists and Turns

Decoding DNA: New Twists and Turns

By | June 1, 2013

Highlights from a series of three webinars on the future of genome research, held by The Scientist to celebrate 60 years of the DNA double helix

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image: Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

By | June 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia. Age: 34

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Salamander Evolution

By | June 1, 2013

Yale University evolutionary biologist Steven Brady studies the evolutionary impacts of roads on the amphibians.

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image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.

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image: Ladybird Bioterrorists

Ladybird Bioterrorists

By | May 16, 2013

The Asian harlequin ladybird carries a biological weapon to wipe out competing species.

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