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image: Mouse Livers Grow and Shrink Daily

Mouse Livers Grow and Shrink Daily

By | May 4, 2017

Feeding-fasting rhythms and light-dark cycles direct regular changes in organ and cell size, as well as ribosome number and protein levels.

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image: More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees’ reproduction and honey bees’ ability to fly.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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Scientists identify a mutation in the CRY1 gene in people with abnormal sleeping patterns.

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image: Circadian Rhythms Influence Treatment Effects

Circadian Rhythms Influence Treatment Effects

By | April 1, 2017

Across many diseases, taking medication at specific times of day may make the therapy more effective.

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image: Infographic: Circadian Clock Affects Health and Disease

Infographic: Circadian Clock Affects Health and Disease

By | April 1, 2017

The body's rhythms could affect numerous ailments as well as how people respond to treatments.

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image: Glia Help Regulate Circadian Behaviors

Glia Help Regulate Circadian Behaviors

By | March 23, 2017

Scientists confirm that astrocytes are involved in regulating molecular and behavioral circadian rhythms in mice. 

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image: An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock

An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock

By | February 21, 2017

Stress-related genes may be preferentially and rhythmically expressed as part of the circadian rhythms of older fruit flies, researchers report.  

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